Posted tagged ‘sleep problems’

Beware melatonin supplements – their labels lie

February 27, 2017

The Pediatric Insider

© 2017 Roy Benaroch, MD

About 36 billion dollars will be spent on vitamins and nutritional supplements in the US this year. It is a huge industry, with big advertising and PR budgets. Maybe it’s time for the manufacturers to spend a little money figuring out how to deliver honest and accurate products.

Tests on a variety of supplements have already shown that most of them are contaminated – many with toxic metals, like lead and arsenic. And a new study of one of the most popular supplements, melatonin, shows that most of the brands available have doses far different from what’s on the label.

Researchers in Canada purchased 31 melatonin products from stores in Guelph, Ontario (IKR! I didn’t know there was a Guelph in Ontario!) They analyzed the content of tablets, liquids, and chewables, and found that few of the products contained their labeled dose. 71% of the products were off by more than 10%, with the actual content of melatonin ranging from 17% to 478% of the labeled dose. There was a huge variability even among the same brand, with different bottles varying by 465% in content. Their research was published in the February, 2017 edition of The Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

Potentially worse: 26% of the samples contained serotonin, a contaminant that can cause serious side effects, especially when combined with a variety of medications.

Though these samples were purchased in Canada, there’s no reason to think melatonin products sold in the US would be any more consistent. Neither country has any laws or standards established to regulate, test, or ensure the quality of “dietary supplements” including melatonin, vitamins, or any so-called “natural” or “herbal” products. In other words, there’s no reason to think that you’re getting what you think you’re getting.

There are some voluntary industry standards, and at least that’s a start. The press release about the melatonin study suggested that consumers from the USA look for a “USP Verified” logo certification from the “United States Pharmacopeial Convention.” I could only find one brand on the USP website of melatonin that’s been certified – “NatureMade” (scroll down the bottom, here. Oddly, the Amazon entries for these products don’t indicate that they’re USP certified.)

Many people purchase herbs and supplements for a variety of reasons – and there are some good clinical studies showing that some of them may help (many others, not so much.) But it doesn’t matter what the studies show if what you’re taking isn’t what’s labeled on the bottle. If the supplement manufacturers want to genuinely help people stay healthy, they need deliver a consistent and reliable product. Otherwise, it’s just smoke, mirrors, and empty promises that might make you sick.

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