Posted tagged ‘immunity’

Vaccinations are the best immune booster

April 26, 2017

The Pediatric Insider

© 2017 Roy Benaroch, MD

The human immune system is an amazing thing. There are thousands of microorganisms – millions, maybe – that are lurking out there, eager to make you sick. You breathe them in. They’re in every bite of food, and all over your hands when you rub your nose. We live in constant bombardment.

And they’re sneaky, too – with changing DNA and proteins to fool us. We’ve got soap and water and some pretty good antibiotics to fight them off, but, really, the vast majority of the work to keep us healthy is done by our own immune systems.

Wouldn’t it be nice to give your immune system a boost, to help it fight off infections? We know moderate (but not heavy) exercise can help, as can a good night’s sleep. What about those “immune booster” vitamin packs they sell? Hint: there’s a reason they say right on the package that they don’t prevent or treat any disease. Save your money.

Another idea: you can just get sick, and at least the next time around your immune system can recognize the germ and fight it off more effectively. Of course, you have to get sick first to enjoy those benefits. And some of those sicknesses can be pretty serious. Or might kill you. Still, no pain no gain, right?

Wrong. There’s a great way to get a real immune boost – a way to help your own immune system, or that of your children, fight off diseases without having to get sick first. They’re vaccinations. They give your immune system a glimpse, a quick safe view, of an infection in a way that won’t make you sick, but will still teach your immune system to recognize the infection if you ever have to fight it off. It’s the best way to prepare your immune army for battle against the infectious enemy, in a way that’s almost risk-free.

Get your sleep and exercise, and eat tasty, home-made foods. Grow a vegetable garden. Hug your kids. Sing like no one is listening, and dance like no one is watching. And vaccinate, too.  These are all great ways to keep your children happy, healthy, and safe.

National Infant Immunization Week Blog-a-thon with woman holding baby. #ivax2protect

Humidifier versus dehumidifier smackdown!

December 5, 2010

The Pediatric Insider

© 2010 Roy Benaroch, MD

Shannon wrote in, “I just recently read in a magazine that a humid environment as opposed to a dry environment is more hostile to viruses. It sounds a little counter-intuitive to me, however, if it’s true would it be best to run my children’s humidifiers all winter long to stave off the flu and other viruses as this article recommended? I tend to run them more in the winter anyway because my kids tend to have more runny noses or their nasal passages are drier and bloodier. What are your thoughts?”

I’m not sure the viruses, themselves, would even care. Viruses are just little teeny packets of genetic material, with a small handful of protein. They’re not cells, so they won’t “dry out”, and I doubt that their survival would depend much on humidity.

I would guess, though, that a dry environment might make it easier for viruses to invade the nasal lining to make your children sick. Viruses can’t penetrate normal intact skin, and even moist surfaces like the lining of a mouth or nose does a pretty good job repelling these little monsters (the viruses, I mean, not the children.) But once the lining of a nose gets dried out and develops cracks and fissures, the viruses can grab hold and jump right in.

By preventing dry air with a humidifier, you’ll also keep whatever mucus is around nicely wet and runny—that’s good, because thin and runny mucus is less likely to plug up noses and sinuses and get infected with bacteria. Thick and sticky mucus just sits there, an inviting bacterial playground. Thin and runny mucus drains, carrying infection away.

If you do run a humidifier all winter, you’ve got to keep it clean. That warm, moist environment can also become a playground for mold. Once a week, take the humidifier apart, wipe it down with diluted bleach (1 capful per gallon) and let the pieces dry before re-assembling.

What kind of humidifier is best? The ultrasonic ones are easiest to clean, so those get my vote. The kind with the big fabric wicks are just about impossible to clean well, and the ones that use a heating coil could cause burns when Junior pulls it over onto her head.

More articles about mucus, which has apparently become a favorite topic at my blog. Momma would be proud:

Out, Damn’d Snot

Control your mucus

Too many colds

A cold lasts longer than you think

Cough and cold medicines don’t work, updated here