Help fight childhood cancer!

Hey hey! My teenage daughter and I will be getting our heads shaved on Saturday to help raise money to fight childhood cancer! Please donate to me, my daughter, or our team! (Since it is in fact my birthday today, you should probably donate to me. But any donations are appreciated!)

Pediatric cancer is more common than you might think. Every year in the US about 16,000 kids (birth through 19 years) get cancer — that means 1 in 285 people will be diagnosed with cancer during their childhood. That’s a lot of children and families affected.

In some ways, the statistics are encouraging. The rates of these cancers, overall, hasn’t changed much over the last 40-50 years — but the survival rates have improved dramatically. Overall there’s an 80% five year survival. But there’s a lot of variability in types of cancer, with some cancers making very little progress. Many types of childhood cancer still have a poor prognosis.

And sometimes the treatment itself can be very difficult. The goal of treating most pediatric cancers is a cure, which means that the treatment itself — surgery, radiation, chemo — is often more aggressive than the treatment for adult cancer. Two-thirds of childhood cancer survivors struggle with health problems related to their cancer or the treatment. There’s still a lot of progress to be made.

The funding for pediatric cancer research is far less than what we might expect. The NIH budget for adult cancer research was 5.6 billion in 2009; for pediatric-specific cancer research, it’s probably in the range of 30 million dollars a year.

Pediatric cancer research needs better funding. We’ve already shown that better treatment leads to dramatically better outcomes, but we need to keep making progress. And public awareness can support both charitable giving by individuals and better support for pediatric cancer among foundations, endowments, and large national cancer organizations.

That’s my why daughter and I will be shaving our heads with the St. Baldrick’s charity. It might seem like a silly sort of stunt — and in a way, it is — but it draws attention to the problem of pediatric cancer in a uniquely pediatric way. We’ll have fun with it, and we’ll have fun with the kids, but in a serious way we hope to raise more money and improve more lives. Please give if you can.

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