The cost of fear

The Pediatric Insider

© 2016 Roy Benaroch, MD

The image of a “mad scientist” can be hard to shake: a deranged man with crazy hair in front of a row of bubbling test tubes and antennae shimmering with a ghostly electric glow. BWAHAHA, my monster is alive!

Real science, of course, has nothing to do with any of that. But it still sparks fear, and that fear has consequences.

One of the best ways to fight Zika virus is to reduce the mosquito population. We’ve got tools – already tested, already shown to be effective and safe – to use releases of sterile mosquitos to stop breeding populations. But we’re afraid to use them.

Parents fearful of vaccines put their own children, and their communities, at risk. One example: diphtheria, eradicated in Spain for 30 years, returned and killed an unvaccinated child. At least 8 other children contracted the diphtheria bacteria, but none of those other children became ill. They had been vaccinated.

Zimbabwe, facing a horrific drought with millions of starving citizens, has announced that they’ll accept no food aid that includes genetically modified organisms. They’d rather starve than eat food that’s often more nutritious and easier to grow with fewer resources. Here’s a funny and illustrative example of how far fear goes: they’ve explicitly banned GMO chickens, despite there being no GMO chickens in Africa, or anywhere else. They don’t exist. That’s what happens when fear makes decisions. Imaginary chickens, eek!

Zika is spreading, causing brain damage and other birth defects. Vaccine-preventable diseases have come roaring back. Ways to help feed the world are rejected. What do all of these follies have in common? Fear, stupid fear, making our decisions.

“So, first of all, let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is…fear itself — nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance.”

Franklin D Roosevelt, 1932

AAAAAA!!!

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