What your kids do affects how their brains grow

The Pediatric Insider

© 2015 Roy Benaroch, MD

A short study to review today—from Pediatrics, November 2014, “Cortical thickness maturation and duration of music training: Health-promoting activities shape brain development.” Researchers looked at MRIs scans of healthy children that were being obtained as part of a larger study of normal brain development, correlating the development of several brain areas with musical training. They found that as kids age, the ones taking music lessons had more rapid growth and maturation of brain centers involving not only motor planning and coordination, but also emotional self-control and impulse regulation.

When you exercise a muscle, it grows bigger and stronger. The same thing, essentially, happens in the brain—but it’s more complicated, because different parts of the brain do different things. What this study confirms is that at least with music, the areas of the brain exercised with musical training become “stronger”—or, at least, larger and thicker, which in brain-terms means more effective. The authors speculate that conditions like ADHD, where those same areas of brain seem relatively under-functioning, might be helped by learning to play a musical instrument.

Think about the bigger picture, too. Whatever your kids are doing, that’s the area of the brain they’re exercising. If they’re reading, they’ll become better readers; if they’re playing tennis, they’ll get better at seeing and hitting a little fuzzy yellow ball. If video games are their main hobby, they’ll get better at making fast decisions and moving their hands quickly. Katy Perry fans will get good at dancing like sharks. You get the idea. At the same time, kids who don’t practice the self-control needed to learn a musical instrument might be missing out on at least one way to help their brains mature.

Get practicing!

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2 Comments on “What your kids do affects how their brains grow”

  1. Jamie Says:

    What’s a good age to begin lessons?

    Like

  2. e canfield Says:

    If you play something, Jamie, you can just start letting your little one fool around with it a bit even before a year. Maybe get a child’s xylophone and play baa baa black sheep with her. We have a keyboard and our 1 year old loves it when Daddy plops him on his lap and they play together.. I would guess that formal lessons before 3 are rare, and even for preschoolers aren’t that common.

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