Preventing colds: Kids show us how it’s done

The Pediatric Insider

© 2011 Roy Benaroch, MD

Want to get fewer colds, skip the flu, and avoid using the toilet face-first? One of the most effective ways to prevent infectious diseases is to stay away from mucus. Other people’s mucus, that is—the infectious toxic goo that sick people can’t seem to avoid spreading all over the place.

Two recent studies illustrate that it really is possible to stay healthier thru goo avoidance. But the kids seem to be better at it than we are.

I wrote earlier about the first study, where adults were observed during, let’s say, events of mucus production. Surprise! The vast majority of adults did nothing to limit the spread of their sneezes, and even helped further spread their germs by wiping their snot-covered hands on doorknobs and other surfaces. Look around you. If you see adults, they’re trying to make you sick.

Compare that to a more recent study of children, summarized here. Danish schoolchildren underwent special training in hand washing, and were required to follow good hand hygiene while in school. Over the following months, compared with kids in other schools without the special training, the children in the handwashing groups had about 25% fewer illnesses and missed days of school. Even better—the following year, when the special training and requirements were dropped, those same children still continued to wash their hands, and continued to have a reduced rate of illnesses. The kids learned, and it worked, and it stuck! Take a lesson from these kids: good hand hygiene is a habit that we can learn, and a habit that really can keep us healthier.

If it makes you sick, it probably likes mucus. Try to keep your mucus to yourself, especially when you’re ill. When you’re sick, sneeze into your elbow and wash your hands! If you don’t want to become ill, wash your hands before eating or especially before touching your own face. In fact, you might be able to prevent many infections by developing a new habit: don’t touch your eyes, your nose, or your mouth without first washing your own hands. The germs on your skin won’t make you ill until you rub them in your eyes or up your nose. With the kids back in school and winter approaching, now’s a good time to work on those anti-mucus, staying-healthy habits. Let’s all keep our snot and germs to ourselves.

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